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Mid-Term Papers

Things to Avoid

 Beyond the tips above, writing the perfect college mid term paper means understanding what you’re saying within the paper and being able to discuss it if asked. If you’re wondering how long it should take to write a mid term paper, do ask for instructions from your professor to obtain clarity on length and detail.

Read you draft term paper out loud or to someone else to help you check for errors or sentences that don’t make sense.

Never wait until the last minute to begin your college mid term paper, if you do, it will appear rushed and probably won’t receive the grade you want. After you’ve determined the topic, what you should discuss, and have the professors instructions at hand, you should be able to determine how much time you need to research and write your paper.

Skip the pretty paper and use plain white, good quality paper. No instructor I ever knew was impressed with colored paper or scented paper.

Finally, if you have a friend or relative who has written numerous college mid term papers, ask them if you can take a look at one of theirs. This can give you an idea of what one looks like, how it flows, what you should cover, and what you should leave out to create the perfect college mid term paper.

A term paper is a research paper written by students over an academic term, accounting for a large part of a grade. Term papers are generally intended to describe an event, a concept, or argue a point. It is a written original work discussing a topic in detail, usually several typed pages in length, and is often due at the end of a semester.

There is much overlap between the terms research paper and term paper. A term paper was originally a written assignment (usually a research based paper) that was due at the end of the "term"—either a semester or quarter, depending on which unit of measure a school used. However, not all term papers involve academic research, and not all research papers are term papers.

History[edit]

Term papers date back to the beginning of the 19th century when print could be reproduced cheaply and written texts of all types (reports, memoranda, specifications, and scholarly articles) could be easily produced and disseminated. Moulton and Holmes (2003) write that during the years from 1870 to 1900 "American education was transformed as writing became a method of discourse and research the hallmark of learning."[1]

Russell (1991) writes that in the 1910s, "the research paper began to harden into its familiar form" adding that plagiarism and the sale of research papers both became a problem during this time.[2]

Plagiarism in the computer era[edit]

See also: Essay mill

In the present day an entire industry has sprung up to provide plagiarized, pre-written or custom written term papers for students of varying levels of education. There are many websites that sell term papers of all levels of quality and writing proficiency, but are often claimed by academic institutions as seriously undermining the academic integrity of the student.[3] Also, plagiarism can be unknowingly committed by students.[4] Although plagiarism can be unknowingly committed it is quite a few steps that can be taken in order to avoid plagiarism. Some of the steps are quotation marks around the words or sentence that you take from a source. even if you list the source at the end of the paper be sure to mark exactly what sentence was taken from the source. Don't just count summarizing as changing a few words, that is still considered plagiarism. Actually take the time to read the content and summarize the main points of the source to how you understood the material without keeping the wording that was already used the same. Also be sure to always list your sources after putting the quote or summarization and also when providing your works cited.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]

  1. ^Moulton, Margaret R. and Holmes, Vicki L (2003) "The Research Paper: A Historical Perspective," Teaching English in the Two Year College 30(4) p.366
  2. ^Russell, David R. Writing in the Academic Disciplines, 1870–1990: A Curricular History. Southern Illinois University, 1991. p.87-8
  3. ^"BBC NEWS | Education | Google bans essay writing adverts". news.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 4 December 2016. 
  4. ^Crawford, Miki (29 September 2010). "Are You Committing Plagiarism? Top Five Overlooked Citations to Add to Your Course Materials". FacultyFocus.com. Retrieved 5 March 2015. 
  5. ^Anne,, Ackley, Katherine. Perspectives on contemporary issues : readings across the disciplines (Eighth edition ed.). Boston. ISBN 9781305969377. OCLC 967940184.